The Suquet and the Old Port
The hill of the “Suquet” is where Cannes began. You can start your tour of Cannes with the old town. You can reach it from various angles, taking steeply sloping narrow streets, crisscrossed with picturesque flights of winding steps where the pedestrian is king.The Suquet and the Old PortVisit the ramparts, the Musée de la Castre, the square tower and the church. Admire the view over the city, the port, the Croisette, the Iles de Lérins and a substantial portion of the Bay of Cannes, Forville market with its rows of food shops (butchers, fishmongers, bakers, wine merchants, etcThe old port unfurls below the Suquet. The oldest section, “Quai St Pierre”, dates from 1838
and accommodates old sailing ships as well as speedboats.
Rue Meynadier
Rue Meynadier is a pedestrian street leading out of the old town of the Suquet. It is full of
wonderful food shops like the famous cheese shop Cénéri, the delicatessen Ernest, the
delights of Jean-luc Pélé, Provencal specialities – and a host of colourful boutiques.
 
Markets
The cool of early morning is the perfect time to take a look around Forville market. The fragrance of thyme, verbena and basil fills the air. The market sellers sing out the virtues of local produce in their lilting accent : tomatoes, olive oil, freshly-caught fish, tasty aniseed biscuits…
A stroll around Forville market is like exploring the whole of Provence, taking a delicious journey steeped in the atmosphere of the South.
 
Rue d’Antibes
Rue d’Antibes, the former imperial royal road linking Toulon to Antibes, is the ultimate shopping street ! To attract the 19th century English colonists, many shops, such as chemists, greengrocers and tailors adopted a Franco-English style. Today, all the major
international High Street names are to be found on Rue d’Antibes.
tour1You can also admire its architectural environment, with buildings from the 19th century, beautiful doors bearing the initials of their first owners, ironwork, and sculptures by Pellegrini dating from 1883 at no. 101 as well as the former Cannes theatre with its facades decorated with masks
 
Port Canto, le Palm Beach,
Pointe Croisette Port Canto was the first private marina in France and remains one of the leading marinas in Europe. It is home to some very fine boats.
Palm Beach was built on the ruins of Fort de la Croix in 1929. It hosted grand society events with famous guests such as King Alfonso XIII of Spain, the Aga Khan, Winston Churchill… The film ” Melodie en sous sol” (The Big Snatch) by Henri Verneuil (released in 1963) was filmed around the swimming pool.
Opposite the Harbourmaster, the “Le Baoli” restaurant, the quintessential location for a Cannes night, is a journey of a thousand flavours. At this marina, you can hire of all types of boats with or without a permit. Not far away, you will discover the splendid Rose Gardens with areas for children. From the Palm Beach car park, you can use the recently installed viewpoint indicator to admire a unique view over the Ile Ste Marguerite and the Bay of Cannes. A cross indicates the place where the first pilgrims took the boat to visit Ile St-Honorat.
 
Musée de la Mer Musée de la Mer The Maritime Museum is located in the oldest part of the Fort Royal on Sainte Marguerite, a listed historic monument, overlooking the sea and surrounded by pine and eucalyptus forests. You can explore the State prison and the cell of the Man in the Iron Mask where the mysterious prisoner was imprisoned for eleven years, the murals by Jean Le Gac as well as underwater and terrestrial archaeological finds.
 
Espace Miramar
Espace Miramar, located on the ground floor of the former ‘Palais Miramar’ hotel, at the corner of La Croisette and Rue Pasteur, is a cultural centre that houses a cinema, large hall and a fine 96m2 room, dedicated to exhibitions.
 
 
Malmaison Arts Centre Malmaison Arts Centre Situated on La Croisette, La Malmaison now hosts four major exhibitions a year. It regularly pays tribute to renowned painters such as Matisse, Ozenfant and Picasso, for whom the French Riviera was an infinite source of inspiration, and internationally